samtrioli

Sam Trioli S.

august 1–12, 2014

open­ing recep­tion: sat­ur­day, august 02, 2014

Pres­i­dent Harry S. Tru­man was born with no mid­dle name. Unable to decide on an actual name, his par­ents gave him the mid­dle ini­tial S, to honor and please his grand­fa­thers, Ander­son Shipp Tru­man and Solomon Young. Until Tru­man became pres­i­dent he in fact did not use a period after his mid­dle ini­tial. Shortly after becom­ing pres­i­dent the edi­tors of the Chicago Style Man­ual informed Tru­man that over­look­ing a period after his mid­dle ini­tial was improper gram­mar and set a poor exam­ple for America’s youth. From that moment for­ward Tru­man signed his name Harry S. Tru­man.
For S., Tri­oli inves­ti­gates the unique­ness of the first sev­eral months of the 33rd Pres­i­dent of the United States. Tru­man served his first term with no vice pres­i­dent, his wife and daugh­ter spend­ing most of their time at home in Inde­pen­dence, Mis­souri, and with a staff that had remained from the Roo­sevelt Admin­is­tra­tion. He was iso­lated dur­ing his tenure as Vice Pres­i­dent, not even being aware of the Man­hat­tan Project. Upon the death of Franklin D. Roo­sevelt on April 12, 1945, Harry S. Tru­man became Pres­i­dent of The United States of Amer­ica. Between April and August of 1945 Tru­man guided the end of the war in Europe, attended the Pots­dam Con­fer­ence in Ger­many, and launched the most remark­able and con­tro­ver­sial air strikes on Japan the world had ever seen.

Through­out the eight years of his pres­i­dency, Tru­man hand wrote let­ters to his wife Bess while they were apart, illus­trat­ing their unique rela­tion­ship in a per­sonal and com­fort­able dia­logue. Bess was often a sound­board for Tru­man, and he bounced ideas and thoughts off of her, truly valu­ing her input. It is remark­able to think that they were so in tune with one another regard­less of the great dis­tances between them. “My Dear Bessie,” Tru­man often wrote, words of endear­ment that we rarely use today as their gen­er­a­tion did. Their cor­re­spon­dence through let­ters left each other hang­ing on words like the edge of a cliff, and stag­ger­ing through the empty spaces between each note.
Within the exhi­bi­tion Tri­oli cap­tures this dynamic between Harry and Bess with two por­traits of the for­mer first cou­ple. Their faces, sur­rounded by a vast­ness of black, demon­strate the jux­ta­po­si­tion of the two as the cen­ter­piece of Amer­ica and the iso­la­tion this role pro­duced between them. The por­traits are bal­anced by a vari­ety of con­tex­tual media, includ­ing imagery from World War II and text pieces that ref­er­ence Truman’s let­ters to Bess. Through­out this vari­ety of medi­ums, the work offers a series of mark­ers, reflect­ing on these tiny pieces of his­tory and the moments accu­mu­lated within the length of a breath.

Sam Tri­oli was born in 1984 in Con­cord, Mass­a­chu­setts and grew up in New Hamp­shire.  He is a con­tem­po­rary artist, cura­tor and musi­cian cur­rently liv­ing and work­ing in New York City. Tri­oli has par­tic­i­pated in numer­ous group and solo exhi­bi­tions includ­ing “Duck and Recover,” The F.U.E.L. Col­lec­tion, Philadel­phia, (2008); “Team Work,” Allan Ned­er­pelt, New York, (2010); “Can’t Hear The Rev­o­lu­tion,” Kun­sthalle Gala­pa­gos, Brook­lyn, (2011); “Some Girls,” curated by Noah Becker, Launch F18, New York, (2011); “Sun­day­Mon­dayTues­day­Wednes­day,” Farm Project Space + Gallery, Well­fleet, Mass­a­chu­setts, (2012); “Ham­mers Down,” 3433, Chicago, IL, (2013); “NADA Art Fair.”  AS | Artists Stu­dios (group booth pre­sen­ta­tion).  New York, New York [2013]; “(con)TEXT,” Sharon Arts Cen­ter, Peter­bor­ough, New Hamp­shire (2013).  Solo exhi­bi­tions include, “Sage­brush Gulch,” Site95, Miami, (2012), and most recently “Bru­maire,” Howard Yez­er­ski Gallery, Boston, (2012).

samtrioli

Sam Trioli S.

august 1–12, 2014

open­ing recep­tion: sat­ur­day, august 02, 2014

Pres­i­dent Harry S. Tru­man was born with no mid­dle name. Unable to decide on an actual name, his par­ents gave him the mid­dle ini­tial S, to honor and please his grand­fa­thers, Ander­son Shipp Tru­man and Solomon Young. Until Tru­man became pres­i­dent he in fact did not use a period after his mid­dle ini­tial. Shortly after becom­ing pres­i­dent the edi­tors of the Chicago Style Man­ual informed Tru­man that over­look­ing a period after his mid­dle ini­tial was improper gram­mar and set a poor exam­ple for America’s youth. From that moment for­ward Tru­man signed his name Harry S. Tru­man.
For S., Tri­oli inves­ti­gates the unique­ness of the first sev­eral months of the 33rd Pres­i­dent of the United States. Tru­man served his first term with no vice pres­i­dent, his wife and daugh­ter spend­ing most of their time at home in Inde­pen­dence, Mis­souri, and with a staff that had remained from the Roo­sevelt Admin­is­tra­tion. He was iso­lated dur­ing his tenure as Vice Pres­i­dent, not even being aware of the Man­hat­tan Project. Upon the death of Franklin D. Roo­sevelt on April 12, 1945, Harry S. Tru­man became Pres­i­dent of The United States of Amer­ica. Between April and August of 1945 Tru­man guided the end of the war in Europe, attended the Pots­dam Con­fer­ence in Ger­many, and launched the most remark­able and con­tro­ver­sial air strikes on Japan the world had ever seen.

Through­out the eight years of his pres­i­dency, Tru­man hand wrote let­ters to his wife Bess while they were apart, illus­trat­ing their unique rela­tion­ship in a per­sonal and com­fort­able dia­logue. Bess was often a sound­board for Tru­man, and he bounced ideas and thoughts off of her, truly valu­ing her input. It is remark­able to think that they were so in tune with one another regard­less of the great dis­tances between them. “My Dear Bessie,” Tru­man often wrote, words of endear­ment that we rarely use today as their gen­er­a­tion did. Their cor­re­spon­dence through let­ters left each other hang­ing on words like the edge of a cliff, and stag­ger­ing through the empty spaces between each note.
Within the exhi­bi­tion Tri­oli cap­tures this dynamic between Harry and Bess with two por­traits of the for­mer first cou­ple. Their faces, sur­rounded by a vast­ness of black, demon­strate the jux­ta­po­si­tion of the two as the cen­ter­piece of Amer­ica and the iso­la­tion this role pro­duced between them. The por­traits are bal­anced by a vari­ety of con­tex­tual media, includ­ing imagery from World War II and text pieces that ref­er­ence Truman’s let­ters to Bess. Through­out this vari­ety of medi­ums, the work offers a series of mark­ers, reflect­ing on these tiny pieces of his­tory and the moments accu­mu­lated within the length of a breath.

Sam Tri­oli was born in 1984 in Con­cord, Mass­a­chu­setts and grew up in New Hamp­shire.  He is a con­tem­po­rary artist, cura­tor and musi­cian cur­rently liv­ing and work­ing in New York City. Tri­oli has par­tic­i­pated in numer­ous group and solo exhi­bi­tions includ­ing “Duck and Recover,” The F.U.E.L. Col­lec­tion, Philadel­phia, (2008); “Team Work,” Allan Ned­er­pelt, New York, (2010); “Can’t Hear The Rev­o­lu­tion,” Kun­sthalle Gala­pa­gos, Brook­lyn, (2011); “Some Girls,” curated by Noah Becker, Launch F18, New York, (2011); “Sun­day­Mon­dayTues­day­Wednes­day,” Farm Project Space + Gallery, Well­fleet, Mass­a­chu­setts, (2012); “Ham­mers Down,” 3433, Chicago, IL, (2013); “NADA Art Fair.”  AS | Artists Stu­dios (group booth pre­sen­ta­tion).  New York, New York [2013]; “(con)TEXT,” Sharon Arts Cen­ter, Peter­bor­ough, New Hamp­shire (2013).  Solo exhi­bi­tions include, “Sage­brush Gulch,” Site95, Miami, (2012), and most recently “Bru­maire,” Howard Yez­er­ski Gallery, Boston, (2012).