klausandme_farm

Klaus + Me

august 29–september 24,2014

open­ing reception–saturday, august 30 6–8pm
KLAUS POSTLER
Klaus Postler was a peri­patetic artist and inde­pen­dent cura­tor whose work cen­tered around the use
of col­lage. As a sem­i­nal fig­ure in the mail art move­ment, Klaus had a long his­tory of exchang­ing works
with artists around the world, his work has been included in over two hun­dred exhi­bi­tions world-wide.

Klaus was a con­sum­mate artist whose life and art were insep­a­ra­ble. In 2005 he received an MFA
from UMASS Amherst and a BA from the UMASS Uni­ver­sity With­out Walls Pro­gram with an indi­vid­ual
con­cen­tra­tion enti­tled: The Artist as Cura­tor. Klaus was the 2001 recip­i­ent of a McDow­ell Fel­low­ship.
Klaus curated “The Ray John­son Memo­r­ial Exhi­bi­tion” at Ham­p­den Gallery and the “Col­lab­o­ra­tions”
exhi­bi­tion at Herter Gallery. He founded both the New England/New York/New Tal­ent bian­nual exhi­bi­tion
and GO! (Global Oppor­tu­ni­ties) where he was intent on explor­ing what was pos­si­ble in the visual arts
cul­ture by work­ing with artists, cura­tors and orga­ni­za­tions to cre­ate a vital arts matrix, which pro­vided
res­i­den­cies and exhi­bi­tion oppor­tu­ni­ties inside and out­side the con­ven­tions of the white cube.

In the sum­mer of 2005, Klaus taught him­self Ger­man and set off for a month of gallery and stu­dio
vis­its in Berlin, Ger­many and came back to the US to curate a trav­el­ling group exhi­bi­tion enti­tled
“Kunst Berlin”. This exhi­bi­tion, like many that Klaus curated, would result in his forg­ing strong and last­ing
friend­ships with artists around the world.

Klaus was fun, and really smart. He was often ridicu­lously silly and off the wall. He lived off the grid as
much as pos­si­ble. He’d work as long as he needed to be able to take time off to do art­work. He did
car­pen­try, odd jobs, prun­ing orchards up and down the north­east, what­ever he could do to get by.
Mean­while he also exhib­ited his work inter­na­tion­ally and curated shows. Klaus died unex­pect­edly in
Jan­u­ary of 2013 at his stu­dio in Conway.

Klaus Postler’s work has been exhib­ited nation­ally and inter­na­tion­ally and is in the per­ma­nent col­lec­tions
of the Whit­ney Museum of Amer­i­can Art in the Ray John­son Memo­r­ial Mail Art Show Archives, Museum
of Mod­ern Art in the Franklin Fur­nace Archives, Getty Museum in the Jean Brown Archives and The
Wexner Cen­ter for the Arts in The Art is in the Mail(ing) Archives.

Eileen Claveloux
Eileen’s work uti­lizes dig­i­tal and ana­log media and processes. These pieces are part of a series enti­tled
“Dias­po­ran Por­traits”. The series is part of an ongo­ing exam­i­na­tion of a hid­den his­tory that con­tin­ues to
have an impact on the descen­dants of sur­vivors of the Armen­ian Geno­cide. Eileen uses a trans­fer process
on clear acrylic that allows light to flow through the images and for shad­ows to be cast by them. Shad­ows
on the faces rep­re­sent the effects of this his­tory on the lives of descen­dants. Trauma can fol­low fam­i­lies
through sev­eral gen­er­a­tions in ways that may be quite hid­den, these pieces attempt to trace that trauma
and make it visible.

Eileen Claveloux holds an MFA from the Uni­ver­sity of Mass­a­chu­setts Amherst and a BFA from The
Uni­ver­sity of the Arts in Paint­ing. Her work has been shown through­out the US and in Ger­many, Arme­nia,
Cameroon and Roma­nia. She has worked col­lab­o­ra­tively with Shirley Whitaker on “Marked for Life”, an
exhi­bi­tion that looked at phys­i­cal mark­ings and the cause and impact of those marks on the bearer.
In 2005 she com­pleted a res­i­dency in Yere­van, Arme­nia where her work was shown at the Yere­van Museum
of Mod­ern Art, and is now in their per­ma­nent col­lec­tion. Since 2007 she has taught Media Arts at East­hamp­ton High School where she estab­lished and curates the annual Arts Festival.

KLAUS + EILEEN
Eileen first met Klaus at UMASS while they were both can­di­dates in the MFA Pro­gram. She was first stuck by his unique way of writ­ing her con­tact infor­ma­tion for a course they were in; every­thing he wrote was back­wards. Over time their friend­ship devel­oped into a close and happy rela­tion­ship. They were together until Klaus’
untimely death.

klausandme_farm

Klaus + Me

august 29–september 24,2014

open­ing reception–saturday, august 30 6–8pm
KLAUS POSTLER
Klaus Postler was a peri­patetic artist and inde­pen­dent cura­tor whose work cen­tered around the use
of col­lage. As a sem­i­nal fig­ure in the mail art move­ment, Klaus had a long his­tory of exchang­ing works
with artists around the world, his work has been included in over two hun­dred exhi­bi­tions world-wide.

Klaus was a con­sum­mate artist whose life and art were insep­a­ra­ble. In 2005 he received an MFA
from UMASS Amherst and a BA from the UMASS Uni­ver­sity With­out Walls Pro­gram with an indi­vid­ual
con­cen­tra­tion enti­tled: The Artist as Cura­tor. Klaus was the 2001 recip­i­ent of a McDow­ell Fel­low­ship.
Klaus curated “The Ray John­son Memo­r­ial Exhi­bi­tion” at Ham­p­den Gallery and the “Col­lab­o­ra­tions”
exhi­bi­tion at Herter Gallery. He founded both the New England/New York/New Tal­ent bian­nual exhi­bi­tion
and GO! (Global Oppor­tu­ni­ties) where he was intent on explor­ing what was pos­si­ble in the visual arts
cul­ture by work­ing with artists, cura­tors and orga­ni­za­tions to cre­ate a vital arts matrix, which pro­vided
res­i­den­cies and exhi­bi­tion oppor­tu­ni­ties inside and out­side the con­ven­tions of the white cube.

In the sum­mer of 2005, Klaus taught him­self Ger­man and set off for a month of gallery and stu­dio
vis­its in Berlin, Ger­many and came back to the US to curate a trav­el­ling group exhi­bi­tion enti­tled
“Kunst Berlin”. This exhi­bi­tion, like many that Klaus curated, would result in his forg­ing strong and last­ing
friend­ships with artists around the world.

Klaus was fun, and really smart. He was often ridicu­lously silly and off the wall. He lived off the grid as
much as pos­si­ble. He’d work as long as he needed to be able to take time off to do art­work. He did
car­pen­try, odd jobs, prun­ing orchards up and down the north­east, what­ever he could do to get by.
Mean­while he also exhib­ited his work inter­na­tion­ally and curated shows. Klaus died unex­pect­edly in
Jan­u­ary of 2013 at his stu­dio in Conway.

Klaus Postler’s work has been exhib­ited nation­ally and inter­na­tion­ally and is in the per­ma­nent col­lec­tions
of the Whit­ney Museum of Amer­i­can Art in the Ray John­son Memo­r­ial Mail Art Show Archives, Museum
of Mod­ern Art in the Franklin Fur­nace Archives, Getty Museum in the Jean Brown Archives and The
Wexner Cen­ter for the Arts in The Art is in the Mail(ing) Archives.

Eileen Claveloux
Eileen’s work uti­lizes dig­i­tal and ana­log media and processes. These pieces are part of a series enti­tled
“Dias­po­ran Por­traits”. The series is part of an ongo­ing exam­i­na­tion of a hid­den his­tory that con­tin­ues to
have an impact on the descen­dants of sur­vivors of the Armen­ian Geno­cide. Eileen uses a trans­fer process
on clear acrylic that allows light to flow through the images and for shad­ows to be cast by them. Shad­ows
on the faces rep­re­sent the effects of this his­tory on the lives of descen­dants. Trauma can fol­low fam­i­lies
through sev­eral gen­er­a­tions in ways that may be quite hid­den, these pieces attempt to trace that trauma
and make it visible.

Eileen Claveloux holds an MFA from the Uni­ver­sity of Mass­a­chu­setts Amherst and a BFA from The
Uni­ver­sity of the Arts in Paint­ing. Her work has been shown through­out the US and in Ger­many, Arme­nia,
Cameroon and Roma­nia. She has worked col­lab­o­ra­tively with Shirley Whitaker on “Marked for Life”, an
exhi­bi­tion that looked at phys­i­cal mark­ings and the cause and impact of those marks on the bearer.
In 2005 she com­pleted a res­i­dency in Yere­van, Arme­nia where her work was shown at the Yere­van Museum
of Mod­ern Art, and is now in their per­ma­nent col­lec­tion. Since 2007 she has taught Media Arts at East­hamp­ton High School where she estab­lished and curates the annual Arts Festival.

KLAUS + EILEEN
Eileen first met Klaus at UMASS while they were both can­di­dates in the MFA Pro­gram. She was first stuck by his unique way of writ­ing her con­tact infor­ma­tion for a course they were in; every­thing he wrote was back­wards. Over time their friend­ship devel­oped into a close and happy rela­tion­ship. They were together until Klaus’
untimely death.